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THE GLOBAL FINANCIAL MELTDOWN
WATCH OUT FOR THE FORTHCOMING GLOBAL VISION 2000 EDITORIAL ON THE MISSING DIMENSION WHICH THE EXPERTS, GOVERNMENT AND MAINSTREAM MEDIA ARE NOT INFORMING YOU ABOUT. WE ARE NOT SURPRISED AS HOW CAN THE BLIND LEAD THE BLIND. THE DEAF DUMB AND BLIND ARE NOT DEALING HOLISTICALLY WITH THIS CORONA VIRUS PANDEMIC. WE WILL NOTIFY YOU ABOUT HOW YOU CAN DEAL WITH AND OVERCOME THE PERFECT STORM CREATED BY THE GLOBAL PANDEMIC AND BANKRUPT DEBT BASED FINANCIAL USURIOUS CAPITALIST SYSTEM. IF PANIC OR FEAR IS NOT THE SOLUTION WHAT IS?




THE VIRUS, THE LOCK DOWN, OIL, THE USD & GETTING OFF THE GRID 






NOT JUST ECONOMIC COLLAPSE  
THIS IS THE COLLAPSE OF A CIVILISATION AND THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A NWO



GREATER DEPRESSION IS UPON US, GOLD REMAINS STEADFAST AS REFUGE 
DOUG CASEY




THE WHITE SHOW BOYZ ARE DESTROYING THE GLOBAL ECONOMY. THIS PANIC IS ALL A HOAX  
GERALD CELENTE




GLOBAL MARKET MELTDOWN IS ON ; IT’S SHEER HYSTERIA 
GERALD CELENTE




ECONOMIC FREEZE IS HERE , GET GOLD , SILVER IF YOU CAN AND GET READY 
JIM RICKARDS




‘THIS IS THE BEGINNING OF THE GREATEST FINANCIAL CRISIS IN US HISTORY’: PETER SCHIFF MAKES DIRE PREDICTIONS TO BOOM BUST  
https://www.rt.com/business/483006-great...us-history


After suffering the worst stock market crash since 1987, the US Federal Reserve has announced a $1.5 trillion injection to ease strained capital markets. It is the biggest action by the Fed since the 2008 financial crisis.

RT’s Boom Bust is joined by the CEO of Euro Pacific Capital Peter Schiff to find out if the Fed’s actions are enough to stop the stock market bloodbath.

“The bull market is clearly over, just look at the numbers,” says the veteran stock broker.
“This is the beginning of the greatest financial crisis in US history,” Schiff says, adding “The financial crisis of US of 2008 will pale in comparison as with the severity of this recession. We are going to have a much greater recession than the one that we had in 2008.”



According to the expert, the difference is that “this one is actually going to have inflation; we are going to have rising consumer prices and a falling dollar which is going to make it so much worse than what we have experienced 10-12 years ago.”  Schiff explains that the coronavirus is just a pin while the debt bubble is the problem. The virus has not only pricked the stock market bubble and the crypto bubble, but it has also punctured the bond market bubble. “So, now we have to deal with the consequences of the disease that the Fed inflicted us with. And unfortunately the Fed’s cure for the coronavirus is going to be fatal for the economy.”  The strategist says that the fiscal stimulus is going to make the situation worse.  “The US is broke, there is no money to stimulate the economy, and all we can do is print money… The bond market is imploding because there is too much debt.”



THE GLOBAL ECONOMY WAS DEATHLY SICK BEFORE NOW, BUT COVID 19 WILL TAKE THE BLAME IF IT CRASHES 
Norman Lewis
https://www.rt.com/op-ed/483353-coronavirus-economic-downturn-predictions


As economists begin to predict what the global economic effects of Covid-19 will be, the danger is we play up the economic damage of the virus while hiding the deep-rooted sources of our contemporary financial doldrums.
It is inevitable that economic forecasts of the impact of Covid-19 on the global economy are being revised daily, if not hourly. It is right that economic forecasters should be updating their predictions. But we all need to keep in mind that these revised forecasts are little more than guesswork – however sophisticated their computer modelling might be.


This is not prejudice against economists, the experts Michael Gove in particular referred to when he said during the Brexit referendum that the British people had had enough of them –referring specifically to their shaky prediction track record. Economic predictions and forecasting are notoriously difficult. It is the reason why leading economist JK Galbraith once quipped that the only function of economists was “to make astrology look respectable.”  We are going to see a proliferation of astrology in the days ahead. The biggest danger is going to be the battle to avoid economic alarmism.


The division of labour between health officials and economic experts is increasingly being blurred. Health officials are being asked about economic impacts, while economists are being called to make predictions about the impact of the disease. Health and economics are being conflated, which is confusing for all; what should be treated as a medical emergency is increasingly becoming a sphere for urgent government economic bailouts and politics aimed at alleviating the fall-out of lockdowns.

These confusions aside, predicting the economic costs of ill-health is very difficult. The Co-Operative Pharmacy reported in 2010, for example, that flu cost UK employers 7.6 million working days this year. It estimated that the cost to the economy was around £1.35 billion. But no-one even really knows the economic costs of these ‘normal’ diseases. Annual deaths precipitated by influenza are much higher than the deaths from coronavirus so far. According to Public Health England, in an average year about17,000 people in England die from flu complications, of which around four-fifths are over 65. But the numbers vary wildly from one year to the next. The relative effects on British gross domestic product (GDP) of a high flu death year compared to a low death year might keep economic modellers busy, but the actual effect gets lost in the longer-term influences and trends.
But there are things we know which should be at the forefront of our considerations. The world economy was already in deep ill-health before anyone had even heard of Covid-19. Losing sight of this means the remedies on offer might be good at stemming the symptoms of a problem, but they ignore the underlying cause, the real source of the malaise, which will remain untreated. This will be worse in the long run than any short-term dislocations we are forced to endure.




The world economy has been, if not on life-support, terminally ill for years. Global growth – and especially advanced-economy growth – this year was already dismal, and has been for many years. Forecasts for this year were already pretty downbeat before most people were aware of the word ‘coronavirus’. The illness is the result of years of diminishing business investment in new technologies and ways of operating, and the propping up by governments of companies that should have gone out of business. The end result? Almost stagnant productivity. People at work are no longer producing more in the same time. This is a significant break from the dominant pattern during the past two centuries of economic expansion. This waning in productivity growth – sinking to little more than flatlining in Britain – is what accounts for most people no longer benefiting from regular increases in living standards.

It is also what has led to the increased dependence on debt and financialisaton. The 2008 crash confirmed the fragility of economic systems that rely too much on borrowing and too little on creating new wealth. We are not in permanent recession, but we are stuck in a cycle of financial crises. Between the crashes, debt keeps things ticking along. The unstable dissonance between the financial and productive economies – reflected in the inflated stock markers – reveal that an adjustment was inevitable. The dramatic falls in global stock markets over the past two weeks were on the cards before the impact of Covid-19 panic set in.
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THE GLOBAL FINANCIAL MELTDOWN - by moeenyaseen - 08-27-2006, 09:59 AM
RE: THE GLOBAL FINANCIAL MELTDOWN - by globalvision2000administrator - 03-22-2020, 01:29 PM

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